Tag Archives: Julie Paschkis

A Rose is …

is a rose is a rose.
 

Here is a blog I wrote in 2014, with a few new images:

Roses

Recently a friend, Julie Little, brought over a big bucket of roses from her garden. There were so many roses that we had more than one bouquet.

The roses were achingly beautiful and they smelled good. But roses fade. Alas.
faded roses

Luckily roses on fabric can provide timeless pleasure. Here are some to savor.

This 19th century English chintz border is from the book  Textile Designs , an encyclopedia of historic fabrics compiled by Susan Meller and Joost Elffers.

chintz england 19th

Susan Meller also wrote an amazing book about Russian Textiles . It includes examples of printed fabrics, embroidery, ikats, paisleys and stripes. It shows the cloth and robes made from them. Here are some rose fabrics from that book.

russia 1870s

In the Russian fabrics there are many rich reds: crimson, scarlet, cherry, carmine, rust and maroon.russia 20thrussia mid 20thrussia late 19thRussian roller printed clothTurkmen robe 1930

This Suzani piece was embroidered. The designs were drawn on the cloth, then separated into panels. Various family members would embroider the separate panels which would then be sewn back together. The slight variations in the density of the stitches and the slight flaws in the registration give the piece life.suzani embroidery 19th

Roses line this woman’s mulisak from Khiva.munisak 20th century

Returning to Textile Designs , you can find these roses from France (1922 and 1930):

france 1922

france 1930

And this bouquet, made in England for export to Portugal in the mid 1800’s.

eng for portugal mid 19th

So, gather (and stitch) your rosebuds while ye may.


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Here is a poem is by Sandra Gilbert, from her book Kissing the Bread.

sandra gilbert

 

Banner Days

 

From 1992 until 2005 Margaret Chodos-Irvine, Deborah Mersky and I worked together as a group. Once a year we designed a series of products based around a theme. We would make them or have them manufactured and sell them at a sale/party.
We called ourselves Troika because there were three of us.
Then we got busy, diverted, and geographically separated; our Troika cart was retired.

Troika Tablecloths 1995

This year Troika will roll again – we are having a show of our art at the Bitters Co. Barn in the Skagit Valley from May 11- 28. Our theme for the show is Still LifeWe are each making our own pieces using different media. We have all meandered and interpreted the theme in different ways.

We also collaborated on some white banners which will float in the middle of the barn.

Embroidery, trapunto, tatting, and lacemaking are fabric arts practiced by early American women. Work that can be described as “white on white” inspired us because of its use of negative space and shadow. Using white ink on white nylon taffeta, we designed and created three giant banners in four busy days.

Margaret and I flew to Texas to work with Deborah in her beautiful studio about an hour from Austin in the hill country.

We planned.

We drew and cut stencils.

We took walks by the river.

We ironed the stencils to the fabric.

We ate.

We stenciled.

As we worked we continued to invent, design, cut and print.

When the prints were dry we removed the stencils and hung up the banners.

UPDATE: Here are the banners hanging in the beautiful Bitters Co. barn. We also made a banner of Troika wheels which hangs on the outside of the barn.

Please come see the banners and our individual work. The show will be up from May 11 – 28, from 12 -4 daily. The opening will be on May 11 from 12-3.

If you would like to learn the stenciling process, please join us for a White on White stencilling workshop at the barn from 1-4 on  Sunday,May 12. (For more information about the workshop please go to www.bittersco.com)

 

 

 

 

Daily Table

In 2014 I wrote a post here about about my love of tablecloths. (Here is a link to Tablecloths: Fabric of Life). This is chapter 2 – a further installment of daily still lives and a noting of the pleasures of the table: tablecloths, dishes, flowers, sunlight, candlelight, food and friends about to arrive.  

Last week I painted a poem on a wooden table for the upcoming Coyote Central auction. Here is the poem Te Deum by Charles Reznikoff.

Bjorn Wiinblad

When I was little my family had a big poster of Vanitas by Bjorn Wiinblad. The curls and swirls and panache of the drawing entered my bloodstream then.

In high school I lived in Scandinavia for a year and saw his work in Copenhagen.

Last month I renewed the acquaintance at the Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle. It was a small show, but choice.

It was fun from the minute you stepped over the checkered threshold.

Wiinblad worked in many media.
He made paintings,

puzzles,

textiles

and ceramics.

The ink drawings are still my favorite work of his.


Lately I’ve been on a bit of an ink drawing splurge myself. I’ll be showing some of this work at i.e. gallery in Edison, WA next month. I hope you can stop by for the opening on Saturday December 2nd from 4-6 pm.  The show will be up from December 2-24th.

You can sniff for echoes of Wiinblad in the ink.

paschkis ink drawing

Full Moon, New Scarves

In January I asked you to speak to me of scarves. I wanted your opinions on fabric, size and designs. (You can see that post and read the comments here.)
I showed three designs and the winner was this one:

In honor of tonight’s full harvest moon I am announcing the arrival of the New Moon Blue Moon Scarf, available to buy at Julie Paprika for $52

I started with a shape like this –

and put it together to make this –

 

Kept going, filled in the holes, and then experimented with different borders –

and ended up with this.

I ordered samples of different fabrics and chose 70% cotton and 30% silk because that fabric had the most saturation. The scarf looked good on both sides.
Now you can wear it and walk out under the October moon.

I also produced a scarf that wasn’t part of the survey: Acrobaticats.
It is 70% cotton and 30% silk, 34″ square, also $52..
These cats can go anywhere.

Please stop by Julie Paprika. Visit the cats, howl at the moon and consider getting a calendar to benefit the ACLU. THANK YOU!!! Thank you for your input many moons ago, and your interest now.

Big Little Roses

painting by Joe Max Emminger

Today my friend Julie Little left a big beautiful bucket of roses on our doorstep. Swoon. I emptied the bucket and filled vase after vase. Now the house is overflowing with roses.

I will share this year’s bucket with you. Here are red roses on a red mola.

Yellow roses in a yellow jug on a yellow tablecloth.

White and pink roses on a piece of Russian embroidery.

Purple roses on orange Mexican oilcloth.

Pink and red roses with a stuffed animal from Peru

Roses outside – on a bench painted by Joe Max Emminger.

Roses inside – on stripes, in light and shadow.

This post is light on fabric and heavy on flowers. It’s summer: time to smell the roses and savor life.

Ice Cream by Julie Paschkis

Julie Little has given me roses for several years. In 2014 I wrote a post about the roses that she left. I wrote more about fabric in that post: here is a link. I didn’t include her name then, but I am now because I want to thank her out loud for her buckets of generosity.

 

painting by Joe Max Emminger

 

 

 

Speak to me of scarves

Designing scarves was a real pleasure last year. Now I am going to start manufacturing them too. It is exciting but also risky. So I would like your opinion before I jump in!

womandiving

Do you have a preference for silk, cotton or silk/cotton blends?
Do you like rectangles (20″ x 70″) or squares (42″)?
Would you like small pocket handkerchiefs? Other shapes?

photo-5

Anything else you want to tell me? I am listening.

telephone-heads

I appreciate this feedback. As a thank you I will randomly pick someone who has left a comment and send that person a Sun Swoon scarf (on February 1st) .

My past designs include Summer Birds (blue), Sun Swoon and Red Star. Summer Birds is almost sold out. They are all for sale at juliepaprika.com

I’ve painted three new designs for possible scarves. I’d like to hear back from you which one I should move forward with. If you like more than one, please rank them. If you don’t like any of them please tell me that too.
Here are the three possible new designs. I will turn them into repeats later.

Courage. You could wear this scarf when you needed extra fortitude.

Paschkis courage scarf

Doodle Squares. Ink drawings on colored squares on a white background.

Paschkis-doodle-squares

Blue Moon Garden. Lots of shades of blue at night.

blue-moon-scarf-sample

I look forward to hearing from you.

I will be traveling from the 14-26 so I might not be able to approve or respond to your comments right away. But eventually I will get to all of them and I appreciate your feedback.

Thank you so much.

paschkis-thank-you

 

 

Red Star

In the winter a bit of red is nice. A red berry or a red bird can warm the landscape. So I designed a red scarf.

I started by looking at red fabrics in one of my favorite books: Russian Textiles by Susan Meller.

russian-textiles

I noticed that the reds were made more beautiful by the colors around them- by more reds, and by contrasting colors. Here is a small feast of some of the Russian textiles that inspired me. Most of them are from the 19th century. They are either block printed or roller printed on cotton.

russian-block-printed-027

russian-textiles029

russian-block-printed-026

russian-paisley032

russian-block-print030

russian-suzani-print031

1900-roller-printed-025

I got out every tube of red gouache that I own and painted the basic building block of my scarf: a red star. The half circle and quarter circle on the edges flip to create whole flowers. I wanted joyful colors.

dragonthread-red-star-copy

I painted a border to use on the ends of the scarf with a different red background.

dragonthread-red-border-copy

I kept a record of all of the colors that I used: one sample sheet for myself, and one for the printer.

dragonthread-red-swatch-copy

Then, with photoshop, I made a design for a long scarf using that basic red star as a building block, flipping and repeating it. It looked too busy with the border panel, so I ditched that. Using the existing art I created a simpler star pattern for the ends, and added a red-orange border all around. Here are some of the steps, and then the final design.

Paschkis dragonthread-red-d Paschkis dragonthread-red-c

red-scarf-small-copy

Linda Teufel of Dragon Threads had it printed in China. The scarf is 20″ x 70″ long on a beautiful, matte silk crepe de chine, with a hand rolled hem. The red saturates through both sides of the scarf. Allow me to model it for you, please.

It is a limited edition. You can buy one here at juliepaprika.com for $48. I’ll also be selling them (and books and prints) at the Ravenna Holiday Art & Craft Sale at the Ravenna Neighborhood Center, December 3rd from 10-3 (6535 Ravenna Ave. NE). Please come by!

I will leave you with a poem and picture that I wrote/drew about the color red. This is a page from a picture book that I am working on now.

Paschkis Red Poem

Oh, Mama

This is a story of many hands.


In May of 2015 I had a show at the  Bitters Co barn in Mt.Vernon, WA. I wrote here about  the barn sized quilt that I made for it: Mr. Big.
Here is a picture of Mr. Big in his new home, where he can stretch his legs over two stories.
mr-big-on-house

This year I wanted to make another big quilt, so Oh Mama was born.
Oh Mama is made of cotton quilting  fabric that I designed over the years for In The Beginning Fabrics. I designed the quilt and cut out the pieces at home. Then I went to Coyote Central and laid it out on the floor. I came home and sewed it together, and then sewed many pieces together for the back. It was too big to spread out in the house so I spread it out on the street.
julie-on-quilt-top
Now to sew the front and back together! I put out a request for help, and  the following kind and wonderful women stepped up:  Betz Bernhard, Margaret Bovingdon, Nancy Harriss, Eileen Hynes, Karen Kosoglad, Christina Reed, Liza von Rosenstiel, Marybeth Satterlee, Joanne Segura, and Lana Sundberg. Nancy took pictures as we worked (at Coyote Central).
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In just a few hours we had tacked it together. I did not include quilt batting because I wanted it to be able  to withstand some weather.
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I took the quilt up to the Bitters Co. barn where it was welcomed by the fabulous Carson sisters, Katie and Amy.
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Installation involved long poles.
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Oh Mama likes to look out at the fields of Mt. Vernon, her new home.
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Oh Mama was part of a show that I had at the Bitters Co.barn this year. I did the work for the show (paintings, drawings, quilts and paper dolls) over the last year and a half. Just before the show I broke my wrist and elbow. The show was still able to go up thanks to Katie and Amy and to my good friends Margaret Chodos-Irvine and Julan Chu.
I think Oh Mama is saying OH my friends are wonderful.

Read on if you would like to e-visit the show at the barn.
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The pictures start with the set up and end with the work in place.
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Thanks for visiting.

Folly Cove and Vida Design

Virginia Lee Burton was an artist who lived from August 30,1909 – October 15, 1968. She and I share a birthday!burton-550Burton was widely known for her children’s books which include Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Katy and the Big SnowThe Little House,  and Calico the Wonder HorseUnknown-2
I am writing about her on this blog because she also designed fabric. She taught block printing to a group of artists in Cape Ann and they formed a group called The Folly Cove Designers. They made fabric, and they also built a community. They would have big parties and dance on the tables.
eino natti143On a recent trip to Gloucester, Massachusetts I saw an exhibit about the Folly Cove Designers at the Cape Anne Museum. Here is a photo of the room there:
Cape Anne MuseumAnd here are some of the textiles that were on exhibit.
Folly CoveIMG_3201
folly cove birds

Lili Wilson for Folly Cover

Lili Wilson for Folly Cove

Virginia Lee Burton inspires me because she jumped into life with both feet, and did what she loved. She didn’t seem to care about categories. There is a wonderful video about her called A Sense of Place.
Virginia Lee Burton

When I flew home I got an email from a company called Vida Design Studio, based in San Francisco. Vida connects designers from all around the world, printing items on demand (clothing and scarves). The producers are paid decent money, the artists get a percentage and a portion of the profit goes to literacy programs. So they are making fabric, and they are building community. A digital age Folly- I’m in!  I designed some shirts for the Vida Design Site, using the name Julie Paprika. Here are the shirts.
Paschkis Hello Paschkis Vida Parrots Paschkis Vida BicyclesPaschkis Vida Ink
And I designed some men’s pocket squares – cotton scarves.
Point no Point scarfPaschkis Rooster Vida

You can see these things at Vida Design. The link is to my work. You can also see zillions of other designs on their site. If you are interested in becoming a Vida Designer you can click here. Vida is having a summer sale until August 28th: discount codes are on my page.

I’m jumping in to this new project. Now I would like an international VIDA party with dancing on the tables!

Virginia Lee Burton Dancers

Virginia Lee Burton Dancers