Tag Archives: Deborah Mersky

Banner Days

 

From 1992 until 2005 Margaret Chodos-Irvine, Deborah Mersky and I worked together as a group. Once a year we designed a series of products based around a theme. We would make them or have them manufactured and sell them at a sale/party.
We called ourselves Troika because there were three of us.
Then we got busy, diverted, and geographically separated; our Troika cart was retired.

Troika Tablecloths 1995

This year Troika will roll again – we are having a show of our art at the Bitters Co. Barn in the Skagit Valley from May 11- 28. Our theme for the show is Still LifeWe are each making our own pieces using different media. We have all meandered and interpreted the theme in different ways.

We also collaborated on some white banners which will float in the middle of the barn.

Embroidery, trapunto, tatting, and lacemaking are fabric arts practiced by early American women. Work that can be described as “white on white” inspired us because of its use of negative space and shadow. Using white ink on white nylon taffeta, we designed and created three giant banners in four busy days.

Margaret and I flew to Texas to work with Deborah in her beautiful studio about an hour from Austin in the hill country.

We planned.

We drew and cut stencils.

We took walks by the river.

We ironed the stencils to the fabric.

We ate.

We stenciled.

As we worked we continued to invent, design, cut and print.

When the prints were dry we removed the stencils and hung up the banners.

UPDATE: Here are the banners hanging in the beautiful Bitters Co. barn. We also made a banner of Troika wheels which hangs on the outside of the barn.

Please come see the banners and our individual work. The show will be up from May 11 – 28, from 12 -4 daily. The opening will be on May 11 from 12-3.

If you would like to learn the stenciling process, please join us for a White on White stencilling workshop at the barn from 1-4 on  Sunday,May 12. (For more information about the workshop please go to www.bittersco.com)

 

 

 

 

TEXtiles

Howdy! I just got back from Texas. Here are some TEXtiles from that great state.

These are from the Rockefeller collection of Latin American Art at the San Antonio Museum of Art.
A very visible bird…

…hidden birds..

…woven fabrics…

…wild embroideries…

..and careful embroideries.

Joe and I were visiting our friend Deborah Mersky.
Her work is pattern-ful and soulful.
Here is a silver leafed window in her house, and a silver leafed wall.

This is a public art piece that Deborah did in downtown Austin.
See more by clicking this link to Deborah’s website.

Deborah’s home is rich in textiles. In her house you can see stripes and zigzags, pillows and tablecloths, curtains and rugs.


Deborah collects bateas: Mexican wooden platters. They aren’t textiles but they might inspire textilists (Textilians?).

The last stop in our Texas tour was Austin. Joe, Deborah and I had a show of small works at Yard Dog Art. You can see it on-line here.

We stayed at the Hotel San Jose. Serendipitous serape sightings!

 

I leave you with this thought from the parking lot at the San Antonio Museum of Art.

IMG_5822

Paper Dolls

What to wear? That is the question asked and answered by this paper doll (made by my niece Zoe Paschkis, many years ago.)

zoe paschkis paper doll

zoe paschkis paper dollsRecently I came across an article about Paper Dolls by Francine Kirsch that I had clipped from the magazine Folk Art in 2007. She talked in the article about some paper dolls that were made professionally to show certain styles of clothes, and she also showed these lovely handmade ones.paper dollsI like the way that every outfit has to confirm to the posture of the model.paper dolls with hipsI like the materials used to make the dresses:paper dollspaper dollsAs in almost everything, sometimes what is revealed is not what is intended to be revealed. In this paper doll family from 1907 the creator reveals racism: the black doll is made to be somewhere between a child and an adult in size.1907 paper dollsSome paper outfits are nearly abstract, like these from the blog Accidental Mysteries.FolkArtPaperDollDressCollection_153 FolkArtPaperDollDressCollection_130Here is a mermaid by Deborah Mersky.mersky paper mermaidLately I have been making big paper dolls. Here I am with a new friend, made with no tape, glue or staples.J. Paschkis and  friend One of my goals is to use all of the paper in different parts of the doll. Here are the pieces of a doll called Paper Howdy, cut from one sheet of paper.

Paschkis howdy pieces

Here is what remained from that 12″ x 18″ sheet of paper.

paper scraps

And here is the assembled Paper Howdy.Paschkis paper howdyI hope this post will inspire you to make some paper dolls of your own.